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​Just One Shade of Grey Letters from the Canary Islands by Barrie Mahoney

'Writing Inspired by an Island in the Atlantic'

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​Just One Shade of Grey

Just One Shade of Grey

At the time of writing, the UK is in a period of collective limbo regarding Brexit. As a result, HM Government, through its network of British Ambassadors and Consulates, is busily issuing advice to expats living in Europe, which is meant to be helpful. In addition, writers, observers and bloggers, such as myself, are also offering their opinion and advice. In reality, of course, no one really knows what will happen, and most of the advice given could turn out to be irrelevant or even unhelpful. It is in this spirit that I offer the following information.

The UK Government has suggested that in the event of a ‘no deal’ Brexit, mutual recognition of driving licences between the UK and Europe will cease. UK citizens wishing to drive in Europe after 29 March 2019 would need to apply for an International Driving Permit (IDP). Whilst I vaguely remember being aware of this document, I had never actually seen one. I thought it was only intended to be used in remote, non-European destinations and was a kind of relic from post-Empire Britain. I couldn't have been more wrong.

The IDP is basically an official translation of the UK licence in various languages, which allows the holder to drive in another country when accompanied by a valid licence from their home country. In theory, the document helps drivers to motor around the world without a language barrier. It is valid in all countries that have signed the 1949 and 1968 Conventions on Road Traffic, and is particularly useful in some countries where car rental companies require one before a car may be hired from them.

I remembered that they used to be available from either the AA or the RAC motoring organisations in the UK, and so decided to apply for one from the AA. The total cost of the licence, together with overseas postage costs, was fifteen pounds. The application form was easily downloaded on line, but it required a postal application and a cheque for payment; certainly, no credit cards or Apple Pay welcome here! The entire process reminded me of a bureaucratic procedure from the 1980s. Two weeks later, the document arrived.

Whilst the application process was surprisingly efficient, the contents were nothing short of disappointing. The actual document is a dirty grey colour, which reminds me of a wartime ration book, rather than a modern driving licence designed to meet the challenges of swinging, post-Brexit Britain. Disappointingly, both the AA and RAC will no longer be permitted to issue IDPs from the end of February 2019. In future, IDPs will only be available from around 2500 Post Offices in the UK who will, I am told, offer a much simpler application process for just £5.50. The permit is valid for twelve months and it will no longer be possible to order one by post, since it now requires a personal visit to a UK Post Office. My guess is that the IDP will never be needed, and certainly not in its present form, but cautious readers may wish to apply for one just in case.

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© Barrie Mahoney

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